Monday, July 28, 2014

{education} Day One: Falmouth Academy class!

Wow! Did we have an exciting and action packed first day at the Falmouth Academy 'Biology and Behavior of Whales' summer class!  First all the students took a pre-evaluation to see how much they already know about whales, and there was a broad range of experience levels.  The best part was that each student was asked to draw a right whale in its environment.

Falmouth Academy student drawing of a whale in its environment
Falmouth Academy student drawing of a whale in its environment
Falmouth Academy student drawing of a whale in its environment
Falmouth Academy student drawing of a whale in its environment
Falmouth Academy student drawing of a whale in its environment

Then we learned some of the basic information about whales - that they are mammals, and the terms cetacean, mysticete, and odontocete.











and we learned a little bit about the endangered North Atlantic right whale



Then the students were treated to a presentation by Monica Pepe from Whale Dolphin Conservation (WDC) where we learned all about whales, right whales, and even got to touch baleen and go inside a 50 foot long inflatable right whale!

Students learn about whales from Monica Pepe at WDC
Students get to touch pieces of whale baleen from WDC
Students get to touch pieces of whale baleen from WDC
Students get to touch pieces of whale baleen from WDC
Students get to touch pieces of whale baleen from WDC
Monica Pepe from WDC demonstrates how LONG baleen is!
Students get to touch pieces of whale baleen from WDC
Delilah, the 50 foot long inflatable right whale from WDC!
Students climb inside the 50 foot long inflatable right whale
Falmouth Academy Whales class by Christin Khan inside the inflatable right whale!
Falmouth Academy Whales class by Christin Khan beside the inflatable right whale!
We learned more about the famous right whale named Delilah and her calf Calvin who survived against all odds, and we heard her praises sung by the famous Calvineers!







video


"Hey There Delilah" by the Calvineers

Hey there, Delilah...how’s it hanging on the ceiling?
You know you scare the kids some times, and send their parents reeling.
Yes you do, ...folks come for miles, ...to see you,
They know it’s true.
Hey there Delilah, people really get a thrill
When they hear you used your baleen to eat tons of krill.
You know they should,
We all hoped it tasted good...it probably would.
And oh, you’re from the Bay of Fundy
Yoh, you’re from the bay of Fundy
Oh, you’re from the bay of Fundy
Yoh, you’re from the bay of Fundy
The (big) Museum had a plan, when you washed up on Grand Manan
And now we see you every single day
They finally moved your shipping lanes
So your friends have nice, safe grazing plains
And big ships never get up in their way...out in the Bay.
You’re a grandma now Delilah, your son turned out to be a daughter
And your kids are swimming happy in the Bay of Fundy water,
Thanks to you, they can do whatever they want to,
This song’s for you!...and Moe Brown too.


Then we learned all about the different methods and tools that scientists use to study whales.





And we talked more about all of the required safety training needed to fly aerial surveys.















Students took what they learned into the "field" where they surveyed the grass to find different cetacean species...
Student 'researcher' surveying for whales in the grass outside Falmouth Academy
Student 'researcher' surveying for whales in the grass outside Falmouth Academy
Student 'researcher' surveying for whales in the grass outside Falmouth Academy
Student 'researcher' surveying for whales in the grass outside Falmouth Academy
Student 'researcher' surveying for whales in the grass outside Falmouth Academy

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